What is SWAN?
The Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) is a multi-site longitudinal, epidemiologic study designed to examine the health of women during their middle years. The study examines the physical, biological, psychological and social changes during this transitional period.

The goal of SWAN's research is to help scientists, health care providers and women learn how mid-life experiences affect health and quality of life during aging. The study is co-sponsored by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Office of Research on Women's Health, and the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine.


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Latest News
  • University Michigan graduate student, Alexis Reeves was selected by the Society of Epidemiologic Research (SER) to present “Racial/Ethnic Differences in Reproductive Aging and Onset of Cardio-metabolic Risk in the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation: Methodological Challenges in Aging Cohorts” as part of the 2019 SER Student Workshop, June […]

    Student has been selected by the Society of Epidemiologic Research to present

    University Michigan graduate student, Alexis Reeves was selected by the Society of Epidemiologic Research (SER) to present “Racial/Ethnic Differences in Reproductive Aging and Onset of Cardio-metabolic Risk in the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation: Methodological Challenges in Aging Cohorts” as part of the 2019 SER Student Workshop, June […]

  • Background: The health consequences of obesity are numerous, including, for example, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.  For many years, researchers have speculated that menopause transition is a contributing factor to obesity; some studies have found gains in body fat and weight in midlife.  But they could not sort out whether these […]

    Changes in Body Composition and Weight During the Menopause Transition

    Background: The health consequences of obesity are numerous, including, for example, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.  For many years, researchers have speculated that menopause transition is a contributing factor to obesity; some studies have found gains in body fat and weight in midlife.  But they could not sort out whether these […]